Undergraduate
Graduate
Alumni
Information
Search
Want to learn more?

Contact:

Amy McNichols, Director of Global Initiatives
International Programs Office
Hill Hall 105
(410) 871-3376

Budapest Course Descriptions

McDaniel Europe in Budapest, Hungary

Click here for the Fall 2012 Budapest Course Offerings or the Spring 2013 Budapest Course Offerings.

 

Communication Courses

COM 1102 — Introduction to Communication: Interpersonal
A broad historical and theoretical introduction to the study of human communication in the context of face-to-face and small group interaction. Homework and classroom participation put a strong emphasis on writing and speaking.

 

COM 1103 — Introduction to Communication: Media
This course studies how individuals use media to communicate, and how such media use affects public communication. Students will explore media' s economic, political, and cultural roles; media' s informative, persuasive, and entertainment functions; 1st amendment issues; and key theories.

 

COM 1110 — Public Speaking
The practical application of basic principles and techniques of public speaking. This is an introductory course designed to prepare students to meet a variety of public oral communication situations.

 

COM 2203 — Communication Research Methods: Quantitative
The purposes and methods of formal researching the study of human communication. The main focus of this course is the communication research process from a quantitative perspective. Specific topics include philosophy of science, research design, data collection, data analysis, statistics, and reasoning.

Prerequisites Minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 in both Communication 1102 and Communication 1103.

 

COM 2204 — Qualitative Procedures
The purposes and methods of formal research in the study of human communication. The main focus of this course is the communication research process from a qualitative perspective.

Prerequisites Minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 in both Communication 1102 and Communication 1103.

 

COM 2265 — Special Topics in Communication
The study of a selected topic in the discipline. Different topics are chosen for each offering, based on students' interests and needs.

 

COM 2295 — Internship in Communication
Supervised field experiences in appropriate settings, usually off-campus, designed to assist students in acquiring and using skills and knowledge of the discipline unique to the selected topic.

* Credits: 0-4
 

COM 2298 — Independent Studies in Communication
Directed study planned and conducted with reference to the needs of those students who are candidates for departmental honors. Qualified students who are not candidates for such honors but who desire to do independent studies are also admitted with permission of the Department.

*Credits: 0-4
 

COM 3326 — Organizational Communication
An examination of the communicative practices employed by organizations in their internal and external activities. Topics include: historical and current approaches to the study of organization communication; the development and application of theory to organizational communication problems; research methods used to evaluate organizations and their communicative practices. Students conduct on-site field studies and prepare written and oral presentations of their findings.

Prerequisites Junior or Senior standing.

 

COM 3338 — European Film Art
Theoretical approaches to the study of film, the analysis of film making techniques and styles with reference to the roots of European film (Fritz Lang, Eisenstein, and the early work of Bunuel), but focusing on the important schools and trends of European cinema in the post-war period. Subjects include the major works of leading film directors, such as Fellini, Visconti, Antonioni, Bunuel, Truffaut, Godard, Wim Wenders, Werner Herzog, and Tarkovsky. (Budapest Campus only.)

Creative Expression. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing.

 

COM 3352 — Intercultural Communication
This course presents in an overview of current issues in communicating across cultures. The course examines how people from various ethnic, gender, generational, racial, cultural and religious backgrounds exchange meaning. Study will focus on many of the cultural variables in communication as well as how those variables work holistically within cultural systems. Topics include how the interaction between language, thinking patterns and culture affect communication, the nature of culture, issues of power, verbal and nonverbal codes.

International Western. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing.

 

COM 4594 — Senior Seminar
This Capstone Seminar requires each student to design, execute and present a significant research project which focuses on a specific Communication phenomenon and uses either

Prerequisites COM 2203, COM 2204

 

ENG 1103 — Introduction to Journalism
A study of the news media in America, including how they work, their strengths, weaknesses, problems, and priorities with an emphasis on print journalism and journalists. Students also receive instruction in the art of news reporting and writing.

Prerequisites English 1101.

 

ENG 2204 — Advanced News Reporting and Writing
Advanced skills in news reporting and writing. Students learn and practice interviewing and other forms of news gathering and apply those methods in a variety of news and feature stories.

Prerequisites English 1103.

 

ENG 2215 — Newspaper Practicum
The first part of a practicum designed to provide students with real life experiences in newspaper publishing. The practicum involves story selection, research, editing, proofreading, layout, photography, graphics, ad sales and newspaper distribution. With the guidance of the instructor, students plan and create The Messenger, which focuses on college life.

*Credits: 2

 

ENG 2216 — Newspaper Practicum

 

The second part of a practicum designed to provide students with real life experiences in newspaper publishing. The practicum involves story selection, research, editing, proofreading, layout, photography, graphics, ad sales and newspaper distribution. With the guidance of the instructor, students plan and create The Messenger, which focuses on college life.

*Credits: 2

Political Science Courses

PSI 1101 — Introduction to Political Science
A survey of political systems with an emphasis on theoretical principles of government and the citizen' s relationship to the state. The course will also examine the methodology of the discipline of political science, including various aspects of the political and governmental process.

Social, Cultural, and Historical Understanding.

 

PSI 1111 — Classical Political Thought
A survey of classical political thought from the ancient Greeks through the medieval period. The course will emphasize the concepts of natural law, Roman law, church-state relations, and other topics relating to the political ideas of the period.

Social, Cultural, and Historical Understanding.

 

PSI 1112 — Modern Political Thought
An overview of political thought from the Enlightenment to the present with particular focus on the origin, nature, function, structure, and organization of the state and its relation to the citizens governed by it. The course explores the justification of governmental authority and the scope of governmental rights to interfere with individual lives and discusses the utility of political philosophy for contemporary life.

Social, Cultural, and Historical Understanding.

 

PSI 2202 — Stat and Local Government
A comprehensive survey of state, county, and urban politics and administration with emphasis on the evolving federal relationship, the development of strong governors, and the emergence of professional state legislatures. Special attention is given to Maryland problems, prospects, policy dynamics and the environment as well as to the politics of public education.

Social, Cultural, and Historical Understanding.

 

PSI 2203 — International Law and Organization
An introduction to the history, purpose, environmental policy and scope of international law and organizations. Questions this course attempts to answer include: How does international law affect states, international organizations, non-state actors, and individuals? Who creates international law, and who is governed by it? What is the relation between international and domestic law? What role do international organizations play in the international system? How does membership in international organizations influence states' abilities to achieve their goals?

International Nonwestern. Prerequisites Political Science and International Studies 1101.

 

PSI 2204 — Approaches to International Relations
An introduction to the major theories and approaches for analyzing global developments, studying the structure and organization of the international system, examining the various actors shaping world politics, exploring causes of conflicts and means for conflict resolution, and reflecting on the future of international relations and the role of individuals in the world community.

 

PSI 2205 — The European Union: History, Institutions, and Major Policies
This is a one-semester course encompassing all essential features of European integration and the existing European Union. (Budapest Campus only.)

Social, Cultural, and Historical Understanding.

 

PSI 2206 — American Political Thought
An overview of American political thought from the colonial period to the end of the twentieth century. Main topics include the origins of American democracy, the debate over the constitution, the expansion of individual rights, the problems associated with industrialization, and contemporary American liberalism and conservatism. The course is taught on the Budapest campus and is specifically designed to acquaint non-American students with the development of the political culture that underlies modern American democracy.

 

PSI 2207 — American Public Policy
An examination of the major theoretical, conceptual, and practical issues in the study of public policy and the policy process, with examples drawn from current issues in American policy. These may include education, civil liberties, political economy, environmental policy, welfare, and energy.

 

PSI 2213 — Comparative Politics of Western European Polities
A comparative methodological analysis of the Western European governments of the United Kingdom, France, and Germany with an emphasis on systems analysis, political culture, structural-functionalism, and elite analysis. All three polities are members of the European Union which is also analyzed with relation to the regional integration of Europe.

International Western.

 

PSI 2215 — Environmental Policy
An investigation of the history, institutions, and decision-making processes that shape environmental policy in the United States. The course will emphasize the roles of and relationship between local, state, and federal governments as well as industry, science, and public opinion in environmental management and protection.

 

PSI 2216 — United States Campaigns and Elections
An examination of the development of American election campaigns from party-based to candidate-centered and media-oriented. The course features in-depth coverage of the role of public opinion polling and its various strategic and tactical uses in campaign politics. Among the topics related to survey research will be sampling, question wording, questionnaire design, and analysis of the results.

 

PSI 2219 — Research Design and Methods
An introduction to the steps involved in designing social science research and to understanding and interpreting quantitative data and conducting basic statistical analysis. Students learn how to develop researchable questions, formulate testable hypotheses, decide on the most appropriate methods for measuring concepts, testing hypotheses, analyzing data, writing up findings and presenting results.

Quantitative Reasoning

 

PSI 2295 — Internships in Political Science
Supervised field experiences in appropriate settings, usually off-campus, designed to assist students in acquiring and using skills and knowledge of the discipline unique to the selected topic.

 

PSI 2298 — Independent Studies in Political Science
Directed study planned and conducted with reference to the needs of those students who are candidates for departmental honors. Qualified students who are not candidates for such honors but who desire to do independent studies are also admitted with permission of the Department.

Credits: 0-4
 

PSI 3307 — U.S. Foreign Policy
An overview over U.S. foreign policy from the Second World War to present. The primary objective is to acquire a general understanding of the main ideas, events, and strategies that have shaped U.S. foreign policy over the past half-century. Topics discussed include containment, deterrence, the nuclear arms race, humanitarian intervention and the use of force, economic assistance and trade, and a number of regional and thematic issues.

 

PSI 3308 — American Constitutional Law
Introduction to the study of the principles of constitutional law as related to the changing political, social, economic and environmental problems of the United States; the role of the Supreme Court in the political process.

Social, Cultural, and Historical Understanding.

 

PSI 3310 — Politics of Developing Areas
An examination of the political, social, environmental policy, and economic problems of "third world" development with Latin America as the regional area of focus. The models of corporatism, bureaucratic-authoritarianism, civil-military relations, and dependency theory are applied to case studies in Argentina, Brazil, Cuba, and Peru. An examination of the role of women in development as well as the impact of development on the environment is also included. Sustainable development models are offered as an alternative to the failed attempts at development.

International Nonwestern.

 

PSI 3317 — Comparative Politics of Communist and Post Communist Political Systems
A comparative exploration of the historical, cultural, social, political, and economic similarities and differences in the systems of the Former Soviet Union and The People' s Republic of China. Both systems attempted to implement Marxism in their systems. The failure of Marxism in the Former Soviet Union and the revisions of the application of the Marxist model in China are explored. Theoretical paradigms that attempt to predict the future of these regimes are also analyzed.

International Nonwestern.

 

PSI 3319 — American Civil Liberties
A study of the First Amendment and the Fourth Estate with an emphasis on the major Supreme Court decisions on freedom of speech, press, environmental policy, communication law, assembly, and the law of mass media. This course involves students in classroom simulations and visits to courts.

Social, Cultural, and Historical Understanding.

 

PSI 3333 - Conflict Resolution, Peacemaking, and Peacekeeping in Post-Cold War World
This course is designed to expose students to the multifaceted nature of conflict on the inter and intra state levels, historically, and in the current post Cold War period. This objective will be achieved by exploring the sources, causes, environmental impact, and determinants of conflict, presenting the various perspectives on the genesis and the amelioration of conflict, and utilizing some case method analysis to demonstrate the life cycles of some specific conflicts and the management or resolution thereof. The cases vary each semester but have included the following: The Middle East Conflict, the Anglo-Irish Conflict, the Gulf War (and now the second war against Iraq), the war on terrorism, and the conflict in former Yugoslavia and Rwanda. The course also covers the spread of radical fundamentalist Islam as a source of conflict in the Post Cold War World and specifically with regard to the "War on Terror."

International Nonwestern.

 

PSI 3398 — Independent Studies in Political Science
Directed study planned and conducted with reference to the needs of those students who are candidates for departmental honors. Qualified students who are not candidates for such honors but who desire to do independent studies are also admitted with permission of the Department.

Credits: 0-4
 

 

PSI 4492 — Senior Seminar
An analysis of various topical or recurring problems in the area of either domestic or international politics. This course serves as a focal point for an integration of methodology, theory, and substantive problem areas.

Electives and McDaniel Plan Courses

BIO 2100 — The Molecular Design of Life
A study of the principles of life, of relationship of structure, function, complexity and information, of organization levels, of importance of macromolecular interactions. Topics include information storage and processing, of flow of information within the cell: from DNA to proteins, Topics also include the flow of energy through living systems, and gene technology, molecular biology of cancer, molecular basis of immunity, muscle contraction and neural functions.

 

CCS 2203 — Introduction to Hungarian Culture
The aim of this course is to give students an insight into the special cultural context they will be surrounded by during their stay in Hungary, mainly through the analysis of some outstanding pieces of Hungarian literature and art.

(Budapest Campus only)

 

CCS 2212 — World Music
Surveys in musical traditions other than those of the Western European-American stylistic periods. Basic musical analysis will be practiced as well as critical reading of texts about music and identifying source, genre, instrumentation, form and purpose of musical examples.

International Nonwestern; Social, Cultural and Historical Understanding.

 

ENG 2100 — Multicultural Voices in American Literature
This course is an introduction to the many voices in contemporary literature of a culturally diverse America. Objectives of this course are two-fold. It measures the concepts of the melting pot and the American Dream against the literary themes of self-identity, alienation, and adaptation by examination of novels, short stories, and poetry by Americans of African, Asian, Hispanic, and Native American ancestry. At the same time, special attention is paid to the way literary works are written. Techniques of close reading will be used to try to identify individual styles of authors and how they are informed by their cultural background.

Multicultural; Textual Analysis.

 

ENG 2215 — Newspaper Practicum
The first part of a practicum designed to provide students with real life experiences in newspaper publishing. The practicum involves story selection, research, editing, proofreading, layout, photography, graphics, ad sales and newspaper distribution. With the guidance of the instructor, students plan and create The Messenger, which focuses on college life.

*Credits: 2

 

ENG 2216 — Newspaper Practicum
The second part of a practicum designed to provide students with real life experiences in newspaper publishing. The practicum involves story selection, research, editing, proofreading, layout, photography, graphics, ad sales and newspaper distribution. With the guidance of the instructor, students plan and create The Messenger, which focuses on college life.

*Credits: 2


ENG 2220 — World Literature
A survey of global literature from the earliest times to the present. Works will vary, but representatives from the world' s major literature will be included each semester. Significant eastern literary texts will be studied, but particular attention will be given to the founding texts of western literature.

International Western; Textual Analysis.

 

GSC 2210 — History of Modern Science
A course which traces the development of the natural and physical sciences from the Scientific Revolution to the present. The emphasis will be upon the emergence of the scientific community and the development and nature of scientific knowledge.

Scientific Inquiry. Prerequisites Junior or Senior standing, or permission of the instructor.

 

HIS 1106 — Western Civilization: 1700 to the Present
Reflection on and analysis of Western traditions organized thematically: the Age of Absolutism; the Enlightenment; the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic period; the liberal, national, and industrial forces of the 19th century; imperialism and the issue of power and domination, the political and moral crises of the 20th century.

International Western.

 

HIS 1134 — Understanding Europe I
This interdisciplinary course offers a comparative study of Europe' s history, culture, heritage, political and economic development. Attention is focused on the 20th century: the two World Wars, the division of Europe after 1945, integration in the West, Soviet-type political and economic systems in East-Central Europe; the disintegration of the Communist Bloc and the Soviet Union; new tension and crises; renewed hopes for a unified Europe; European institutions and organizations; Europe' s role in world affairs. (Budapest Campus only.)

International Western; Social, Cultural, and Historical Understanding.

 

HIS 1135 — Understanding Europe II
This interdisciplinary course offers a comparative study of Europe' s history, culture, heritage, political and economic development. Attention is focused on the 20th century: the two World Wars, the division of Europe after 1945, integration in the West, Soviet-type political and economic systems in East-Central Europe; the disintegration of the Communist Bloc and the Soviet Union; new tension and crises; renewed hopes for a unified Europe; European institutions and organizations; Europe' s role in world affairs. (Budapest Campus only)

International Western; Social, Cultural, and Historical Understanding.

 

HIS 2105 — Holocaust and Memory

 

HIS 2202 — Formation of Western Europe
An introduction to the diverse peoples and societies that created what is conventionally termed "Western Civilization." The course focuses on the formative period of that tradition, and provides a firm chronological basis for understanding the interaction, evolution, and achievement of these peoples and societies in the ancient, medieval, and early modern periods.

International Western.

 

HIS 2229 — U.S. History in the Cold War Era, 1890-1920
A survey of some of the main currents in United States history since the end of the Second World War. Topics include: the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, the countercultural movement, and the Post-Cold War Era.

Social Cultural and Historical Understanding.

 

HIS 2298 — Independent Studies in History
Directed study with permission of the Department.

*Credits: 0-4

 

HUN 1101 — Elementary Hungarian I
The acquisition of oral/aural skills through intensive exposure to Hungarian used both as the medium of communication and the object of study. It enables students to express their daily experiences accurately in spoken and written Hungarian, and to understand communications of a moderate level of difficulty.

(Budapest Campus only)

 

HUN 1102 — Elementary Hungarian II
The acquisition of oral/aural skills through intensive exposure to Hungarian used both as the medium of communication and the object of study. It enables students to express their daily experiences accurately in spoken and written Hungarian, and to understand communications of a moderate level of difficulty.

(Budapest Campus only)

 

PHI 1113 — Philosophy from Ancient Times to the Renaissance
An introduction to Western philosophy beginning with Egyptian and Greek thought, their development and transformation during the Hellenic and Roman periods, the Christian impact on philosophy during Medieval Times and the revival of classical philosophy and Neo-Platonism in the Renaissance. We will focus on questions such as: What is philosophy? How can we establish knowledge about reality and the metaphysical, how can we cultivate ourselves and face death? Special emphasis will be given to the critical analysis of and reflection on texts and concepts from Hesiod, the Pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle, Zeno, Epicurus, Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, and Picco della Mirandola.

Social, Cultural, and Historical Understanding; Textual Analysis.

 

PSY 1106 - Introduction to Psychology
An introductory course designed to develop an understanding of the basic principles governing behavior, with emphasis on the scientific method of studying behavior. Intelligence, motivation, emotion, perception, learning, personality, workplace issues, and social factors that influence the individual will be considered.

Social, Cultural, and Historical Understanding

 

PSY 3212 — Psychology of Gender
This course offers an examination of the psychological and behavioral differences between men and women. The origin of gender differences will be addressed from biological, developmental, and social psychological perspectives. This class will use psychological research and theory to examine how gender differences affect the functioning of men and women in work, relationships, health, etc. Emphasis will be placed on understanding gender as a social psychological construct.

Prerequisites Psychology 1106

 

SIS 2212 — Gender, Fiction, and Sexuality in Central Europe
This course offers an interdisciplinary view of examination of the psychological and behavioural differences between men and women in a historical perspective focusing on Europe, especially on Eastern Europe and Hungary. The origin of gender differences will be addressed from biological, developmental, and social psychological perspectives. This class will use psychological research and theory to examine how gender differences affect the functioning of men and women in work, relationships, health, etc. Emphasis will be placed on understanding gender as a social psychological construct.

Sophomore Interdisciplinary Seminar

 

Business Adminstration and Economics Courses

BUA 1101 — Principles of Accounting I
Fundamental principles of accounting with emphasis on the preparation and interpretation of financial statements. Attention is given to the collection and reporting of pertinent information for creditors, management, and investors. The second semester includes the preparation of data for internal management purposes; the collection, presentation, and interpretation of information for purposes of decision-making, cost control, and managerial planning.

Prerequisites Placement above MAT 1001.

 

BUA 1102 — Principles of Accounting II
Fundamental principles of accounting with emphasis on the preparation and interpretation of financial statements. Attention is given to the collection and reporting of pertinent information for creditors, management, and investors. The second semester includes the preparation of data for internal management purposes; the collection, presentation, and interpretation of information for purposes of decision-making, cost control, and managerial planning.

Prerequisites Placement above MAT 1001.

 

BUA 2209 — Principles of Marketing
An introduction to the marketing function. The focus is primarily on "for profit" firms and their approaches to the marketing discipline. The course tests the student' s mastery of fundamental marketing concepts, principles, and definitions. Several case studies supplement the required texts and lecture contents.
 

BUA 2220 — Psychology in the Workplace
An exploration of the principles of psychology as they are relevant to the work environment. Included will be a discussion of how psychologists can help improve the workplace and address organizational concerns. Topics include selection, training, personnel evaluation, and the characteristics of a variety of work environments. Discussions will also consider how these practices may affect organizational or individual effectiveness and attitudes.

Prerequisites Psychology 1106.

 

BUA 2295 — Internships in Business Administration
Supervised field experiences in appropriate settings, usually off-campus, designed to assist students in acquiring and using skills and knowledge of the discipline unique to the selected topic.

* Credits: 0-4


BUA 2298 — Independent Studies in Business Administration
Directed study planned and conducted with reference to the needs of those students who are candidates for departmental honors. Qualified students who are not candidates for such honors but who desire to do independent studies are also admitted with permission of the Department.

* Credits: 0-4
 

BUA 3324 — Managerial Economics
The application of economic theory and quantitative methods to solve business problems. Emphasis is on analysis of demand, cost, and profit under conditions of imperfect information and uncertainty. Business pricing strategies receive special attention.

Prerequisites Economics 2201, Statistics 2215, or permission of the instructor.

*Cross-listed with Economics 3324.

 

BUA 4323 — Corporate Finance and Financial Management
The management of business funds, with emphasis on the techniques of financial analysis, the financial environment in which firms operate, the sources and forms of external financing, and the allocation of funds to competing alternatives such as plant and equipment, working capital, and financial investment.

Prerequisites Business Administration 1101, Statistics 2215, or permission of the instructor.
 

ECO 2201 — Principles of Economics
The study of the economic foundations of any society: price theory — the market system, allocation of resources, and income distribution; macroeconomic theory — national income and employment, money and banking, growth, recession, inflation, and international trade.

Social, Cultural and Historical Understanding. Prerequisites Mathematics 1001, Mathematics 1002 or placement above Mathematics 1002.

 

ECO 2298 — Independent Studies in Economics
Directed study planned and conducted with reference to the needs of those students who are candidates for departmental honors. Qualified students who are not candidates for such honors but who desire to do independent studies are also admitted with permission of the Department.

* Credits: 0-4 

 

ECO 3303 — Microeconomic Theory
The theory of demand, production, cost, and resource allocation in a market economy. Models of market structure are developed and various forms of market failure are analyzed. Also developed are models of risk and uncertainty and theories of factor pricing and income distribution.

Prerequisites Economics 2201 or permission of the instructor.

 

ECO 3304 — International Economics
The principles of international trade and finance: study of classic trade theories, trade policy, exchange rate markets, balance of payments, trade and growth/development, open economy business cycles, international organizations, and exchange rate policy.

Prerequisites Economics 2201 or permission of the instructor.

 

ECO 3320 — Macroeconomic Theory
The study of national income and price determination, growth, and business cycles; the consumption/ leisure tradeoff, expectations and dynamic decision making, asset markets and investment, nominal frictions, and the role of fiscal and monetary policy.

Prerequisites Economics 2201 or permission of the instructor.

 

ECO 3324 — Managerial Economics
The application of economic theory and quantitative methods for solving business problems. Emphasis is on analysis of demand, cost, and profit under conditions of imperfect information and uncertainty. Business pricing strategies receive special attention.

Prerequisites Economics 2201, Statistics 2215, or permission of the instructor.
*Cross-listed with Business Administration 3324
 

ECO 4310 — Money and Financial Markets
The study of the financial sector and its importance: market structure and financial instruments, asset pricing and interest rate determination, the operations and behavior of banks and other financial institutions, money-creation and central banking, and the interrelationship between money and financial markets and the macro economy.

Prerequisites Economics 2201 and senior standing, or invitation of the instructor.  


ECO 4405 — The History of Economic Thought
The development of economic theory from ancient times to the present. Contributions of Greece, Rome, and the Middle Ages; major emphasis on mercantilism and nineteenth- and twentieth-century economic analysis.

Prerequisites Economics 2201 or permission of the instructor.  

 

MAT 1107 — College Algebra and Trigonometry
The basic concepts of algebra and trigonometry needed for the study of calculus. Included are properties of exponents; solving equations and inequalities; graphing; properties of polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions.

Quantitative Reasoning. Prerequisites Mathematics 1001, Mathematics 1002 or placement by the Department

 

MAT 1117 — Calculus I
Initial study of limits, derivatives and integrals; review of trigonometric functions; differentiation techniques and formulas applied to rational and trigonometric functions; applications of derivatives including curve sketching; extrema and rate problems; definition of the integral; elementary applications of integrals.

Quantitative Reasoning. Prerequisites Mathematics 1107 or placement by the Department.

 

MAT 2218 — Linear Algebra
A study of the theory of finite-dimensional vector spaces, linear transformations, matrices, determinants, inner products, and eigenvalues.

Quantitative Reasoning. Prerequisites Mathematics 1117 or 1118 or placement by the Department.

 

STA 2215 — Elementary Statistics for Social Science
Basic statistical principles and techniques; summarizing and presenting data, measuring central tendency and dispersion in data, basic concepts of probability and probability distributions, estimation of parameters and testing of hypotheses through statistical inference, linear regression and simple correlation.

*Not open to students who have completed Mathematics 3324.

Quantitative Reasoning. Prerequisites Mathematics 1001, Mathematics 1002 or placement above MAT 1002.


STA 2216 — Statistical Methods
Development of underlying assumptions, limitations, and practical applications of modern statistical analysis. Emphasis is on multivariate regression and analysis of variance and related computer techniques. Techniques of experimental design and statistical inference in various contexts are developed. Time series and forecasting topics are included.

Quantitative Reasoning. Prerequisites Statistics 2215 or Mathematics 3324.

 

Physical Education Courses

EPE 1039 — Basic Aerobics

Credits: 0.5

Instruction in the fundamental skills and basic knowledge of aerobics.
The class meets approximately 15 hours.

EPE 1047 — Folk/Social Dance (Salsa)

Credits: 0.5

Instruction in the fundamental skills and basic knowledge of Salsa.
The class meets approximately 15 hours.

EPE 1055 — Special Topics in Physical Activities (Yoga)

Credits:0.5

Instruction in the fundamental skills and basic knowledge of yoga.
Each class meets approximately 15 hours.

EPE 1069 — Badminton

Credits: 0.5

Instruction in the fundamental skills and basic knowledge of badminton.
Each class meets approximately 15 hours.

EPE 1071 — Basketball

Credits: 0.5

Instruction in the fundamental skills and basic knowledge of volleyball.
Each class meets approximately 15 hours.

EPE 1091 — Volleyball

Credits: 0.5

Instruction in the fundamental skills and basic knowledge of volleyball.
Each class meets approximately 15 hours.

 

Competence Courses

FYS 1101 — Intro to Liberal Arts Through Research
Instruction in the nature and practice of research and the central role that research plays in a liberal arts education. This seminar course will introduce students to the research process and the research paper: how to establish a research topic, generate ideas, gather and evaluate research materials from a variety of sources, cite sources appropriately, and organize and present research effectively in both written and oral form. The course will also introduce students to basic bibliographical materials, the different forms that research takes in different disciplines, and the ethical standards of research in the academic community. Students will develop their own research projects, drawing on a variety of print and electronic source materials.
*First-Year Seminar.

 

ENG 1002 — College Composition
Instruction in the organization, coherence, and development required for college papers. Intensive study of the conventions of written English, including grammar, punctuation, and sentence construction.
*Placement determined by the English department.

 

ENG 1101 — Introduction to College Writing: the Argument
Instruction in how to write clear, correct, and effective expository prose; practice in careful, analytical reading of significant literature; training in research techniques.
*Placement based on faculty recommendation.

 

ENG 1101 — Introduction to College Writing: the Argument
Instruction in how to write clear, correct, and effective expository prose; practice in careful, analytical reading of significant literature; training in research techniques.
*Placement based on faculty recommendation.

 

MAT 1001 — Basic Mathematics (Math Workshop)
Review of basic mathematical concepts including the properties and operations of whole numbers, fractions, decimals, and integers; percents; ratios and proportions; basic geometry; and graph interpretation.

Credits: 0

 

TOEFL Intensive Course
Non-credit course designed to help prepare students for the TOEFL exam. Includes units on reading, listening, speaking, and writing.

Credits: 0
 

 

Art/Art History Courses

AHY 1113 — History of Western Art I
A survey of painting, sculpture, and architecture from 15,000 B.C. to 1400 A.D. Included are Near Eastern, Egyptian, Greek, Roman, and Medieval Art.

Creative Expression.

 

AHY 1114 — History of Western Art II
Continuation of the survey of History of Western Art I, 1400 to present. Emphasis is placed on the Renaissance, Baroque, Romantic, and Modern periods.

Creative Expression.

 

AHY 2222 — Art of the Medieval World
A study of the Early Christian, Byzantine, Romanesque, and Gothic Arts in Europe. Social, Cultural and Historical Understanding

Creative Expression.

 

 

AHY 2239 — Romanticism and Impressionism
A study of the major artists of the nineteenth century including David, Goya, Delacroix, Courbet, Manet, Monet, Degas, Van Gogh and Gauguin. Both European and American art are included.

International Western; Social, Cultural and Historical Understanding.

 

AHY 2240 — Twentieth-Century Art
Painting and sculpture in Europe and America from 1900 to the present day. Emphasis is placed on emerging artistic trends.

 

AHY 2242 — At and Culture of Islam
An investigation of the architecture, painting, and other arts of the Islamic world. Areas covered include the arts of Syria, Iran, Turkey, Medieval Spain, North Africa, Central Asia, and Moghul India.

International Nonwestern

 

AHY 2250 — Traditional Native American Arts and Architecture
An examination of the unique varieties of Native American cultures and the works of art and architecture that were created from ancient times to the twentieth century. While the course examines the arts from all the Americas, emphasis will be placed on the arts of the regions now referred to as the United States and Canada.

Multicultural

 

AHY 2298 — Independent Studies in Art History
Directed study planned and conducted with reference to the needs of those students who are candidates for departmental honors. Qualified students who are not candidates for such honors but who desire to do independent studies are also admitted with permission of the Department.
*Credits: 0-4
 

AHY 2301 — The Art of the Baroque in Northern Europe
This course examines the developments in architecture, sculpture, and painting in Northern Europe during the 17th century. It will examine the art of Germany, The Netherlands, Flanders, and France and the art of such masters as Rembrandt, Vermeer, Rubens, Poussin, De la Tour, as well as the palace at Versailles.

Social, Cultural and Historical Understanding.

 

AHY 2302 — Italian Renaissance Art
This course examines the developments in architecture, painting, sculpture, and the minor arts of Italy between 1300 and 1600. Masters such as Brunelleschi, Raphael, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, and Titian are analyzed and compared within the historical, religious, political, sociological, and cultural context of the time period.

Social, Cultural and Historical Understanding.

 

AHY 2302 — Italian Renaissance Art
This course examines the developments in architecture, painting, sculpture, and the minor arts of Italy between 1300 and 1600. Masters such as Brunelleschi, Raphael, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, and Titian are analyzed and compared within the historical, religious, political, sociological, and cultural context of the time period.

Social, Cultural and Historical Understanding.

 

AHY 3200 — Writing in Art and Art History
Studio Art is a creative discipline; Art History is a Humanities discipline, yet they are both paths to careers that require similar and overlapping writing skills. This course is designed to introduce the Junior level student to those skills through a variety of writing experiences, culminating in a group project that will model graduate level research. The course will focus on an academic art historical theme.

 

AHY 4492 — Seminar in Art History — Capstone Seminar
A major research project and presentation under the supervision of art historians.

*Credits: 1

 

ART 1101 — Perceptual Drawing
A studio course in drawing concentrates on developing an understanding of perceptual drawing technique that emphasizes proportion and spatial conventions. Compositional skills are developed, and different mediums are explored. Students develop creative problem solving skills by investigating complex still life arrangements.

Creative Expression.

 

ART 1117 — Design
An introductory investigation of two-dimensional design principles involving the elements of art in solving visual problems. Issues of consumerism and the development of a personal portfolio in a variety of media are stressed.

Creative Expression.

 

ART 2210 — Digital Photography
This course explores the frontiers of digital photography. Students will be photographing their assignments with their own digital camera. The course will extensively use the computer for manipulation of the images in Photo shop and printing. No prior knowledge of Photo shop is required. This course will require a digital camera.

Creative Expression.

 

ART 2216 — Graphic Design I
A studio activity stressing the importance of the imaginative and creative talents of the artist in today' s commercial art world.

Prerequisites Art 1101 and 1117.

 

ART 2295 — Internship in Studio Art
Supervised field experiences in appropriate settings, usually off-campus, designed to assist students in acquiring and using skills and knowledge of the discipline unique to the selected topic.

* Credits: 0-4

 

ART 2298 — Independent Studies in Studio Art
Directed study planned and conducted with reference to the needs of those students who are candidates for departmental honors. Qualified students who are not candidates for such honors but who desire to do independent studies are also admitted with permission of the Department.

* Credits: 0-4
 

ART 3307 — Web Design
This course teaches Website creation, interface design, user experience, and work flow/project management. Students will focus on the basics of optimizing graphics for the Web and assembling and managing a Website. Emphasis is on both design and technical skills.

 

ART 3310 — Water Color
Experimentation with at least ten different techniques of watercolor painting.

 

ART 3313 — Painting
An introductory course in oil painting with emphasis on realistic or recognizable objects. The mixing and application of paint to the painting surface and at least five painting techniques are studied.

 

ART 3318 — Graphic Design II
A studio course dealing with the technical realm of advertising graphics, illustration, and informative and promotional art. Field trips to a variety of art agencies are included.

Prerequisites Art 2216.

 

ART 4490 — Portfolio Preparation
Designed to aid the student in the creation of a professional portfolio. Students will select, prepare, light, photograph, and scan their art work. There will be instruction on digital versions, both on-line and on CDs and DVDs.

 

ART 4492 — Capstone: Senior Show Preparation
This course will prepare the students for their Senior Exhibition and for entering the venue of exhibiting their work. Students will select, sequence, and prepare their art work for the show under the careful supervision of a faculty member. Work will be matted and/or framed to exhibition quality standards. Students will also be involved with the marketing aspect of showing their work and the preparation of an artist' s statement.
*Credits: 1
 

Psychology Courses

Psychology is a pluralistic discipline with roots in and connections to the natural sciences, the social sciences, medicine, and the humanities. The McDaniel Europe program will provide students with an introduction to these various roots, endeavoring to provide rigorous theoretical and practical training necessary for a career as a psychologist in medicine, business, and education, as well as preparation for a graduate-level work.

Areas examined in the major include:

  • behavioral psychology
  • cognitive psychology
  • neurology and psychophysiology
  • developmental psychology
  • personality psychology
  • clinical psychology and counseling
  • social psychology
  • quantitative research methods
  • health psychology
  • organizational and workplace psychology

Completion of a major in psychology at McDaniel Europe should prepare one for:

  • masters and doctoral programs in psychology and allied fields
  • careers in human resources and business management, the health industry, counseling services, education, and elderly care and human services.

Click here for additional information and a listing of course requirements for the Psychology major.

 
Homecoming
October 25, 2014, 12:00 am
Holloway Lecture at McDaniel Lounge
October 28, 2014, 7:30 pm
McDaniel Free Press Weekly Meeting
October 29, 2014, 8:30 pm
Graduate Open House at Hoover Library
October 30, 2014, 5:30 pm
Terror Trot & Block and Roll at Gill Center
November 1, 2014, 12:00 am
Spring Undergraduate Registration
November 3, 2014, 12:00 am
Fall Open House at WMC Alumni Hall
November 9, 2014, 11:00 am
Student Solo Recital at McDaniel Lounge
November 14, 2014, 7:30 pm