M.S. in Counseling

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OVERVIEW

McDaniel’s Counseling Program goals are modeled after the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Education Programs (CACREP) common-core areas as defined by the Standards for Preparation, and on the National Board for Certified Counselors (NBCC) standards and approved content areas.  McDaniel College’s program in counseling has been evaluated by the Maryland State Department of Education and meets its requirements.  In addition, we have received accreditation from the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) in 2003 and 2009.

PROGRAM PURPOSE

Since the Counseling Program at McDaniel College prepares individuals to be counselors in several environments, the training has a dual purpose, i.e., to ensure the counselor’s professional growth and skill development, and to increase the counselor’s personal growth and self-awareness.  This latter purpose is emphasized and given serious focus throughout the program.  Both cognitive and affective learning are considered necessary in counselor preparation, and this belief is reflected throughout the program.  It is also a goal of the program to prepare the Master’s level counselor to integrate research, theory, practice, and reflection into all aspects of his/her training, reflected in course content and objectives.  The Counseling Program strives to maintain a balance between planned sequences and flexibility to respond to the individual needs of the student.  Increased emphasis has been placed on practical application of knowledge, skills, and self-awareness within the course structure.  Therefore, the students are involved in experiential learning in the core courses, an emphasis which intensifies as they move through the sequence.

Program Specializations 

The primary role of the Counseling Program is to prepare mental health workers at the Masters level in Counseling with specializations in either School Counseling (51 Credits) or Mental Health Counseling (60 Credits).

School Counseling

The School Counseling Specialization ensures the student is eligible to apply for School Counseling Certification through the Maryland State Department of Education and/ or apply for certification in Pennsylvania.  This will occur upon completion of the school counseling practicum (100 hours in a school setting), internship (600 hours in a school setting), and all degree requirements. School counseling practicums and internships involve substantial time commitments and in some cases require leaves of absence or relinquishment of current employment. Appropriate advanced planning is imperative. 

Mental Health Counseling

The Mental Health Counseling Specialization leads to eligibility for licensure, in both MD and PA upon completion of 60 credits which include a field practicum (100 hours) and an internship (600 hours).  Students are eligible to sit for their National Counselor Exam (see relevant State Board requirements for NCE and other exams required). Mental Health Counseling counseling practicums and internships involve substantial time commitments and in some cases require leaves of absence or relinquishment of current employment.  Appropriate advanced planning is imperative.

Off Campus Option:  A Mental Health Counseling Track is being offered in Owings Mills.  The nature of this program is geared for working students who prefer the proximity of Owings Mills and a set-up of courses that are scheduled for one night a week and/or online, with a course load of 2 classes at a time.  Click here for more information.

 

Ms. Lisa Lorenz, LCPC
Curriculum Coordinator, Counseling Programs
llorenz@mcdaniel.edu

WHY MCDANIEL

  • Earn a degree that meets professional standards and competencies leading to certification in School Counseling in either Maryland or Pennsylvania
  • Eligibility for the National Counselor Examination and licensure in either MD or PA (see state requirements)
  • Learn through application with a program that encourages a variety of experiential learning and personal growth opportunities
  • Understand all aspects of counseling through coursework that blends research, theory, and practice
  • Small class size
  • Vast expertise of faculty and adjuncts
  • Excellence in academics

Admissions Requirements

• Completed application for graduate study

• Submit the non-refundable application fee

• Official transcripts verifying completion of an undergraduate degree from an accredited college or university with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.75.

Three recent letters of recommendation from faculty or employers

• All prospective candidates in the Counseling program must successfully complete an in-person interview with a Counseling advisor. (Effective date July 1, 2014)

Degree Requirements

• Minimum 3.00 G.P.A.

• Successful completion of 51 credit hours (School Counseling) or 60 credit hours (Mental Health Counseling)

• Practicum 100 hours and internship 600 hours

COURSES

School Counseling Specialization
Mental Health Counseling Specialization
Electives

IMPORTANT DATES

FALL ADMISSION

Applicants who have completed the application process, which includes all the qualifying materials and the interview, prior to the July 1 deadline, will have priority in admission to the program.

Those applicants will be guaranteed a decision by August 1, and will be assured of an orientation meeting for registration at the earliest date available.  Applications submitted after July 1, will be considered for Fall courses but may be limited to Fall II Online courses due to space and adviser availability.


SPRING ADMISSION

Applicants who have completed the application process, which includes all the qualifying materials and the interview, prior to the December 1 deadline, will have priority in admission to the program.

Those applicants will be guaranteed a decision by January 10, and will be assured of an orientation meeting for registration at the earliest date available. Applications submitted after January 10, will be considered for Spring courses but may be limited to Spring II Online courses due to space and adviser availability.


SUMMER ADMISSION

Applicants who have completed the application process, which includes all the qualifying materials and the interview, prior to the April 1 deadline, will have priority in admission to the program.

Those applicants will be guaranteed a decision by May 1, and will be assured of an orientation meeting for registration at the earliest date available.  Applications submitted after May 1, will be considered for Summer courses but may be limited to Summer II Online courses due to space and adviser availability.

Faculty

The program also utilizes lecturers who are experienced professionals in the public schools, private practices, mental health agencies, and colleges to ensure that students obtain diverse and practical perspectives from the current field of counseling and psychology.The program also utilizes lecturers who are experienced professionals in the public schools, private practices, mental health agencies, and colleges to ensure that students obtain diverse and practical perspectives from the current field of counseling and psychology.

Curriculum Coordinator of the Counseling Programs: Lisa Lorenz, MS in Counseling from Loyola University, 2008, LCPC in the state of Maryland, MA in Moral Theology from St. Charles Borromeo, 1997, and a BA in psychology from Rutgers University, 1994.  Curriculum Coordinator of both School Counseling and Mental Health Programs;  Coordinator of off campus Counseling Programs (cohort); Coordinator of the Mental Health Counseling practicum and internship placements; Chairperson for CACREP Accreditation; Adjunct Lecturer; Courses taught: Counseling Theories and Techniques, Practicum in Advanced Theories; Mental Health Counseling Internship

Career: 15 years teaching in elementary and middle school; 5 years as a principal of an elementary K-8 school, and clinician with the University of Maryland, Department of Psychiatry, working with at-risk children, adolescents, and families in urban school settings; Private practice as providing counseling for children, adolescents, and adults.  Special areas of interest:  depression and anxiety disorders, bereavement, anxiety, pastoral and spiritual concerns, trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy, behavior interventions for children/adolescents in home and school settings and animal assisted therapy.

 

Associate Professor
Dr. Simeon Schlossberg, Ph.D., in Counseling Psychology from the University of Connecticut. Directs the pre-licensure Mental Health Counseling Track and internships. Specialty and research areas include: the treatment of anxiety and depression in adolescents, Bullying, and Mental Health Counseling. Courses taught include Introduction to Counseling,   Human Growth & Development Throughout the Life Span, Practicum in Advanced, Theories, Techniques and Applications of Counseling, and Field Practicum in Mental Health Counseling. Email Dr. Schlossberg at  sschloss@mcdaniel.edu.

 

Senior Lecturer/Co-Coordinator of Counseling
Dr. Mary Anne Reichelt, D.Min. , in Pastoral Counseling from Eden Theological Seminary. Licensed Professional Counselor in Missouri, Advises prospective and new students to the Counseling Program; Coordinates the School Counseling track and internship. Specialty areas and research include: mindfulness and the practical applications of neural integration; the science of the mind; integrating the wisdom of indigenous cultures with contemporary counseling theories, and family systems. Courses taught: Theories and Techniques of Counseling, , Practicum in Advanced, Theories, Techniques and Applications of Counseling, Family Systems. Email Dr. Reichelt at mreichelt@mcdaniel.edu.

 

Associate Professor
Dr. Julia Orza, Ph.D., in Counseling Psychology from the University of Connecticut.   Mental health consultant and facilitator/speaker for diversity-sensitivity training in Maryland and Pennsylvania schools and non-profit organizations.  Specialty areas and research interests include: diversity sensitivity and multiculturalism, training counselors using the expressive arts, and empathy. Courses taught include Diversity-sensitive Counseling, Practicum in Advanced, Theories, Techniques and Applications of Counseling,  The Art of Counseling, and an Honors course at the undergraduate level: Worldview & Privilege. Email Dr. Orza at jorza@mcdaniel.edu.


Coordinator of School Counseling Internships
David W. Bearr, M.A. in Counseling from Washington University; C.A.S.Ed. in Educational Psychology from The Johns Hopkins University. National Certified Counselor (NCC) and Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor (LCPC) with Clinical Supervision Endorsement. Specialty areas and research include Early College Awareness, Learning Styles, and School Counseling Curriculum. Courses taught: School Counseling Curriculum and Programs, Career Development, and Internship.

 

Adjunct Lecturers:  The program also utilizes lecturers who are experienced professionals in the public schools, private practices, mental health agencies, and colleges to ensure that students obtain diverse and practical perspectives from the current field of counseling and psychology.

  • Steven Burnett    
  • Thomas J. Craney
  • James F. Dasinger
  • Barbara R. Ebaugh
  • Victoria Engel-Thomas
  • Jenny Good
  • Cindy Green
  • James Funkhouser
  • Cheryl S. Held
  • Judy Klinger
  • Lori Mostofsky
  • Julie Matheney
  • Paul Mazeroff
  • Mindy R. Milstein
  • Chuck Neri
  • Stacy Stoddard
  • Richard J. Simmons
  • Rocky Spino
  • Melissa Trevathan

FAQ's

  1. How long does it take to finish the program?
    The average length of time to complete the program is 31/2 years.  The minimum time to finish the program is 2 ½ years.  The maximum time limit is six years.  
  2. How many courses can I take?
    The typical student takes 6 credits per semester.  This program is not considered a full time program.  The maximum credits for a semester is 9.  In the summer, students can take a maximum of 9 credits over the course of the 3 summer sessions, but no more than 6 credits in any one session. Those students who are receiving Financial Aid are required to take a minimum of 6 credits per semester.
  3. Can I transfer my graduate course work from another college/ university?
    You may transfer up to 12 credits for the Mental Health Counseling and 9 credits for School Counseling, provided that the courses are equivalent to the required counseling courses and are not older than 6 years from the start of your first class.
  4. I already have a Master’s degree in Counseling but need further courses to meet the 60 credit requirement for licensure; do I need start another Masters?  
    No.  The Counseling Program is also a Professional Studies program.  Students who are seeking to fulfill the licensure board requirements will apply as “Counseling LCPC course sequence”.
  5. I work full time during the day, how can I go back to school for a masters?
    The Counseling Programs are geared towards the working people.  All classes are offered in the evenings starting at 4:50 or 7:30 and meet once a week.  In addition, there a number of classes that are also offered online however, not all can be done online due to the fact that counseling courses are experiential.in nature.
  6. I am a full time teacher, how can I possibly work and do a 100 hour practicum and 600 hour internship for a Masters in School Counseling?
    Many school districts support their teachers and will allow for adjustments in teaching duties and schedules or some other form of agreement.  But not all school districts are able to accommodate, and therefore require a leave of absence during the internship.  This must be discussed and seriously considered with your principal and school district administrators before starting the School Counseling Program.

Mission

I. THE MISSION OF GRADUATE AND PROFESSIONAL STUDIES

The First Principles have long committed McDaniel College to the development of liberally educated women and men who think critically, creatively, and humanely. The philosophical outlook of graduate and professional studies is grounded in these principles.

The mission of graduate and professional studies is to prepare culturally competent professionals committed to leadership in their field. We place students in the center of a community rich in the liberal arts tradition, and we emphasize a foundation of knowledge and reflective decision-making based on current research, theory, and practice.

To accomplish this mission the graduate and professional studies program at McDaniel College prepares professionals who:

  • Are specialists in their field of study who value the balance and interdependence of current theory, research, and practice.
  • Advocate for and facilitate the personal growth and well-being of a diverse clientele.
  • Use appropriate technology, assessment, and analytical tools to solve problems and make decisions in their field.
  • Are prepared to interact, communicate, and practice in a variety of settings each with unique constraints and cultures.
  • Are committed to life-long learning and continuing their personal and professional growth.

The graduate programs leading to professional certification/licensure also adhere to the unit’s conceptual framework – to prepare knowledgeable, caring, and reflective practitioners. The framework is consistent with the First Principles and the graduate mission statement.